“Haitians May Leave Their Country, but It Never Leaves Them” (NYT)

Haitians May Leave Their Country, but It Never Leaves Them” (NYT) by Aminatta Forna (August 27, 2019)

“Throughout the stories in “Everything Inside,” Edwidge Danticat’s birthplace, Haiti, emerges in an almost mythic fashion. It is a land where a life can be changed, a land that exists both in the past and the present, whose essence may be carried as far as Miami or Brooklyn. Perhaps most of all, it is a land that is rarely visible, for despite its overwhelming presence in these stories, Danticat sets only two of them there. In and from this unseen Haiti a woman’s ex-husband’s new lover will be kidnapped; a woman’s father will return to be part of a bright post-dictatorship future; a faithless husband will try to reconcile with his wife, only to lose her and his daughter in the earthquake of 2010; a desperate man, ditched from a raft, will crawl onshore and into the arms of the woman who will become his wife.”

For more, click through the New York Times link.

“Arcade Fire Members Talk Haitian Rum and Keeping It Loud at Their Restaurant Agrikol” (Eater)

Chef and Owners of Agrikol.

Arcade Fire Members Talk Haitian Rum and Keeping It Loud at Their Restaurant Agrikol,” by Tim Forster. July 29, 2019. (Eater).

“It’s been over three years since two members of famed band Arcade Fire — Régine Chassagne and Win Butler — opened a restaurant in Montreal’s Village. Working with Toronto restaurateur Jen Agg and her partner Roland Jean, Agrikol quickly became a go-to for Haitian food and rum-laden cocktails, and then even more of a hub when next-door bar Ti-Agrikol opened.

Agg and Jean left the restaurant in 2018 to focus on their Toronto businesses (perhaps the most amicable split ever, notes Butler), but the restaurant is still going strong. Butler, Chassagne, and Agrikol chef Paul Toussaint sat down with Eater to talk about it.”

“Latina Reads: Haitian Women Authors to Make Room for on Your Bookshelves” by Virginia Isaad

Latina Reads: Haitian Women Authors to Make Room for on Your Bookshelves,” By Viriginia Isaad, May 07, 2018.

“Haiti is a Caribbean country rich in revolution and Black freedom. Enslaved Africans achieved independence from France in 1804, after centuries of colonial rule. Haiti, which means “mountainous country” in the language of the Taínos who first inhabited the land, is the source of inspiration for the works of the women on this list — for its beauty, its resistance and its turmoil.

Here, brilliant Haitian women authors, on the island and in the diaspora, you should know and read.”

“Etazini-Imigrasyon: Yon Jij Federal Mande pou Pwogram TPS la Kontinye” (VOA Kreyòl)

Etazini-Imigrasyon: Yon Jij Federal Mande pou Pwogram TPS la Kontinye” -Ekip Sèvis Kreyòl VOA – 4 Oktob

“WASHINGTON, DC — Ozetazini, yon jij federal bloke tout aksyon administrasyon Trump la te vle pran pou l mete fen nan yon pwogrm ki pwoteje yon gwoup imigran k ap viv ilegalman nan peyi a kont depòtasyon. Pwogam nan fasilite anviwon 300 mil imigran ki sòti nan peyi sa yo: Ayiti, Soudan, Nikaragwa avèk Salvadò; imigran sa yo gen pèmisyon pou yo viv, etidye e travay Ozetazini.”

A Haitian Slave Turned Emperor Brings Celebration and Controversy to Brooklyn

A Haitian Slave Turned Emperor Brings Celebration and Controversy to Brooklyn,” by Jeffery C. Mays

August 18, 2018

“But the naming of Jean-Jacques Dessalines Boulevard — along Rogers Avenue between Farragut Road and Eastern Parkway — and the neighborhood designation were not without complications.

Some felt Little Haiti was redundant because the area had previously been christened Little Caribbean by another group. And the street co-naming was delayed because of Dessalines’s controversial history…”